Saturday, August 31, 2019

Daily Thought For August 31, 2019

Faithful To Prayer

Jesus gave me to understand how a soul should be faithful to prayer despite torments, dryness, and temptations, because oftentimes the realization of God's great plans depends mainly on such prayer. If we do not persevere in such prayer, we frustrate what the Lord wanted to do through us or within us. (Diary, 872) 

Reflection 

It's nice to think we have it made once we reach some kind of spiritual plateau that pleases us. But it just isn't so. The old "torments, dryness, and temptations" can return. And new ones can be worse. Then − like putting one foot in front of the other to move ahead − we need to say one prayer after another. To, like Jesus, in our anguish, "pray longer." 

Prayer 

Help me persevere in prayer, Dear Lord. Especially when You seem distant. 


Jesus, I trust in You. 

From Day By Day With Saint Faustina 365 Reflections p.23

Monday, August 26, 2019

Daily Thought For August 26, 2019

Showing Mercy To Our Neighbor

Help me, O Lord, that my eyes may be merciful, so that I may never suspect or judge from appearances, but look for what is beautiful in my neighbors’ souls and come to their rescue.

St. Faustina Kowalska

**The next Daily Thought will be Saturday, August 31**

Saturday, August 24, 2019

Daily Thought For August 24 ,2019

God Saves Us By Coming Into Our Broken World ⎻ We Must Do The Same

God saves us, then by making himself little, near and real. First God makes himself little. The Lord, who is “meek and humble of heart” (Mt 11:29), especially loves the little ones, to whom the kingdom of God is revealed (Mt 11:25); they are great in his eyes and he looks to them (cf. Is 66:2). He especially loves them because they are opposed to the “pride of life” that belongs to the world (cf. 1 Jn 2:16). The little ones speak his own language, that of the humble love that brings freedom. So he calls the simple and receptive to be his spokespersons; he entrusts to them the revelation of his name and the secrets of his heart. Our minds turn to so many sons and daughters of your own people, like the martyrs made the defenseless power of the Gospel shine forth, like those ordinary yet remarkable people who bore witness to the Lord’s love amid great trials, and those meek and powerful heralds of mercy who were Saint John Paul II and Saint Faustina. Through these “channels” of his love, the Lord has granted priceless gifts to the whole Church and to all mankind. It is significant that this anniversary of the baptism of your people exactly coincides with the Jubilee of mercy.

Then too, God is near, his kingdom is at hand (cf. Mk 1:15). The Lord does not want to be feared like a powerful and aloof sovereign. He does not want to remain on his throne in heaven or in history books, but loves to come down to our everyday affairs, to walk with us. As we think of the gift of a millennium so filled with faith, we do well before all else to thank God for having walked with your people, having taken you by the hand, as a father takes the hand of his child, and accompanied you in so many situations. That is what we too, in the Church, are constantly called to do: to listen, to get involved and be neighbours, sharing in people’s joys and struggles, so that the Gospel can spread every more consistently and fruitfully: radiating goodness through the transparency of our lives.

Finally, God is real. Today’s readings make it clear that everything about God’s way of acting is real and concrete. Divine wisdom “is like a master worker” and “plays” (cf. Prov 8:30). The Word becomes flesh, is born of a mother, is born under the law (cf. Gal 4:4), has friends and goes to a party. The eternal is communicated by spending time with people and in concrete situations. Your own history, shaped by the Gospel, the Cross and fidelity to the Church, has seen the contagious power of a genuine faith, passed down from family to family, from fathers to sons and above all from mothers and grandmothers, whom we need so much to thank. In particular, you have been able to touch with your hand the real and provident tenderness of the Mother of all, whom I have come here as a pilgrim to venerate and whom we have acclaimed in the Psalm as the “great pride of our nation” (Jud 15:9).

Pope Francis -- excerpt from the Homily for World Youth Day 2016 in Częstochowa July 28, 2016


Thursday, August 22, 2019

Daily Thought For August 22, 2019

Living Books Thanks To The Holy Spirit!

The Apostles did not come down from the mountain like Moses with stone tablets in their hands. They emerged from the Cenacle carrying the Holy Spirit in their hearts and offering everywhere treasures of wisdom and of grace as spiritual gifts flowing from a gushing spring. They went preaching to the whole world, they themselves being the living law, as if they were books animated by the grace of the Holy Spirit. 

St. John Chrysostom In Mt. Hom., 1, 1:PG 57-58, 15.

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Daily Thought For August 21, 2019

What Freedom In Christ Looks Like

The hardest war is the war against oneself.

One must disarm.

I waged this war for years, it was terrible.

But now I am disarmed.

I’m no longer afraid of anything, because love banishes fear.

I am disarmed of the need to be right, to justify myself by judging others.

I am no longer on guard, jealously clutching my wealth.

I accept and share.

I do not particularly care about my ideas, my projects.

If somebody suggests better ones — no, I should say good ones not better ones — I accept without regrets.

I have stopped making comparisons.

What is good, true, real, is always best for me.

That’s why I’m not afraid anymore.

When we have nothing left, we have no fear.


If one disarms oneself, if one dispossesses oneself, if one opens oneself to the Love that makes all things new, then that Love erases the bad past and makes for us a new time where everything is possible.

Patriarch Athenagoras of Athens (b.133-d190)

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Daily Thought For August 20, 2019

In Difficult Times Don't Forget The Resurrection

Remember that the passion of Christ ends always in the joy of the Resurrection, so when you feel in your own heart the suffering of Christ, remember the Resurrection has to come, the joy of Easter has to dawn. Never let anything so fill you with sorrow as to make you forget the joy of the Risen Christ!

St. Teresa of Calcutta

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Daily Thought For August 17, 2019

Let Charity Be Your Guide

Whatever troubles may be before you, accept them bravely, remembering whom you are trying to follow. Do no be afraid. Love one another, bear with on another, and let charity guide you all your life. God will reward you as only he can.” 

St. Mary MacKillop

Friday, August 16, 2019

Daily Thought For August 16, 2019

Seasons of Life

All of the seasons of life come together in the soul. Sometimes we feel winter's sterility, distraction, distaste, and boredom, sometimes spring's dew, with the fragrance of holy blossoms, and sometimes a burning desire to please our good God. What remains is autumn, and even then we may see no great harvest. 

Yet it often happens that in threshing the wheat and pressing the grape we find a greater yield than we had expected. We want it always to be spring and summer, but there must be vicissitudes of the interior life as well as the exterior. 


Only in heaven will everything be springtime in its beauty, autumn in its fruitfulness, and summer in its ardor. There will be no winter there; but here winter is necessary for the work of abnegation and for the thousand minor but beautiful virtues that we exercise in a fallow time. 

Let us, then, continue to put one foot in front of the other. Provided our hearts be true, we will walk aright. 

from Roses Among Thorns ⎼ Simple Advice for Renewing Your Spiritual Journey ⎼ St. Francis de Sales pp.3-4

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Daily Thought For August 15, 2019

The Assumption ⎼ The Fulfillment Of Human Desire

In this regard I would like to reflect on an aspect of the affirmation of the dogma where assumption into heavenly glory is mentioned. All of us today are well aware that by the term "Heaven" we are not referring to somewhere in the universe, to a star or such like; no. We mean something far greater and far more difficult to define with our limited human conceptions. With this term "Heaven" we wish to say that God, the God who made himself close to us, does not abandon us in or after death but keeps a place for us and gives us eternity. We mean that in God there is room for us. To understand this reality a little better let us look at our own lives. We all experience that when people die they continue to exist, in a certain way, in the memory and heart of those who knew and loved them. We might say that a part of the person lives on in them but it resembles a "shadow" because this survival in the heart of their loved ones is destined to end. God, on the contrary, never passes away and we all exist by virtue of his love. We exist because he loves us, because he conceived of us and called us to life. We exist in God's thoughts and in God's love. We exist in the whole of our reality, not only in our "shadow". Our serenity, our hope and our peace are based precisely on this: in God, in his thoughts and in his love, it is not merely a "shadow" of ourselves that survives but rather we are preserved and ushered into eternity with the whole of our being in him, in his creator love. It is his Love that triumphs over death and gives us eternity and it is this love that we call "Heaven": God is so great that he also makes room for us. And Jesus the man, who at the same time is God, is the guarantee for us that the being-man and the being-God can exist and live, the one within the other, for eternity.

This means that not only a part of each one of us will continue to exist, as it were pulled to safety, while other parts fall into ruin; on the contrary it means that God knows and loves the whole of the human being, what we are. And God welcomes into his eternity what is developing and becoming now, in our life made up of suffering and love, of hope, joy and sorrow. The whole of man, the whole of his life, is taken by God and, purified in him, receives eternity. Dear Friends! I think this is a truth that should fill us with deep joy. Christianity does not proclaim merely some salvation of the soul in a vague afterlife in which all that is precious and dear to us in this world would be eliminated, but promises eternal life, "the life of the world to come". Nothing that is precious and dear to us will fall into ruin; rather, it will find fullness in God. Every hair of our head is counted, Jesus said one day (cf. Mt 10: 30). The definitive world will also be the fulfilment of this earth, as St Paul says: "Creation itself will be set free from its bondage to decay and obtain the glorious liberty of the children of God" (Rom 8: 21). Then we understand that Christianity imparts a strong hope in a bright future and paves the way to the realization of this future. We are called, precisely as Christians, to build this new world, to work so that, one day, it may become the "world of God", a world that will surpass all that we ourselves have been able to build. In Mary taken up into Heaven, who fully shares in the Resurrection of the Son, we contemplate the fulfilment of the human creature in accordance with "God's world".

Let us pray the Lord that he will enable us to understand how precious in his eyes is the whole of our life; may he strengthen our faith in eternal life; make us people of hope who work to build a world open to God, people full of joy who can glimpse the beauty of the future world amidst the worries of daily life and in this certainty live, believe and hope. Amen!

excerpt from the homily of Pope Benedict St Thomas of Villanova Parish, Castel Gandolfo, Sunday, 15 August 2010

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Daily Thought For August 14, 2019

Meditation Leads To Prayer


Is meditating already a form of praying, too? “Meditation is above all a quest” (CCC 2705). Meditation means, first of all, reflection about the articles of faith. Therefore to meditate is not yet to pray, but it should lead to prayer. For in pondering what God has to say to us through his Word, through the things in nature and the events in history, prayer can be “enkindled”, and meditation can become prayer.

Father Leppich, the great Jesuit preacher and founder of “Action 365”, encouraged Christians to make even the daily newspaper an occasion for meditation. This of course demands serious thought about the events in the world, reflection that does not merely take the news as grist for an insatiable curiosity, but rather seeks God’s purpose and method in all things. What does God want to say to us through this earthquake, through that war, perhaps through a small, seemingly “insignificant” item among the announcements of the day? The Bible is the great school of meditation: it teaches us not to read the events of history as merely an endless chain of incidents, but rather to recognize God’s hand in them and to hear his Word speaking to us through them.…

Meditation begins when we go beyond the surface of events, of stories, of texts, and run into traces of the living God; when it is no longer a matter of quenching our thirst for knowledge, of understanding with our reason, but rather of answering the personal question that crops up in meditation: “Lord, what do you want me to do?” (CCC 2706).

So it happened with Saint Ignatius of Loyola, who through his Spiritual Exercises has become for many a teacher of meditation. In the long period of recuperation after his injury in Pamplona, he discovered the method of regular, orderly meditation upon his own life (examination of conscience), but especially upon the life of Christ, so as to see and order his own life in the mirror of Jesus and to make the right decisions according to God’s will. The fundamental meditation (Ignatius calls it “principle and foundation”) concerns man’s final goal, eternal salvation, toward which all thought and actions should be directed. Meditation finds its daily nourishment, preferably, in the Gospel, in the deeds and sufferings of Jesus, in his words and his attitudes.

The goal of meditation is to “internalize” the subject meditated upon, no longer to reflect only upon its exterior, but to taste it from within. What methods to use is a secondary question; they should assist with recollection, with engaging the imagination, with interior and exterior discipline. They can prepare us for the grace that is sought and prayed for in meditation: “that I may know [Christ] and the power of his resurrection” (Phil 3:10).


Schönborn, C. (2003). Living the Catechism of the Catholic Church: Paths of Prayer. (M. J. Miller, Trans.) (Vol. 4, pp. 76–77). San Francisco: Ignatius Press.

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Daily Thought For August 13, 2019

Trust In God Alone

Philippians 4:13: "I can do all things through him who strengthens me."

But don't I need to rely on my own strength too? 

Padre Pio's assurance: "A soul who felt its weakness and had recourse to God for help has never fallen. On the contrary, the soul is only defeated and overcome when, trusting in what it believes to be its abundant strength, thinks it can always sustain and bear temptations. Thus, it happens that the poor thing, out of presumption, believing it was touching the heavens, suddenly finds itself falling right to the doors of hell. 

"Trust, therefore, and take heart. Don't let Satan's prolonged war frighten you; don't lose heart at the weakness you feel, because the soul that fears does not trust [itself], but stays awake and prays because of its weakness, and thus it becomes strong. But on the contrary, as unfailingly happens to those who trust in themselves, as if they were a god, they don't have to wait long before experiencing their miseries and weakness. 

"Do not fear, but rather have greater confidence in divine mercy. Humble yourself before our merciful God and thank him for all the favors he wants to grant you, and for all those he has granted you up to the present." 


Lord, don't ever let me rely on my own strength; help me to always rely on yours. Thank you for everything you've done - and will do - for me. Amen. 

from Padre Pio's Words of Hope edited by Eileen Dunn Bertanzetti p. 130. 

Monday, August 12, 2019

Daily Thought For August 12, 2019

Showing Forth God's Concern Through Our Concern For Others

Show yourself grateful, sincere, and interested in others and in the things that concern them, first of all in their families. Reveal to all whom I send you My Heart and My Face. 

from In Sinu Jesu When Heart Speaks to Heart (The Jounral Of A Priest At Prayer - A Benedictine Monk p. 107e

Saturday, August 10, 2019

Daily Thought For August 10, 2019

Finding Balance & Listening to The Lord

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

We are now in the heart of summer, at least in the northern hemisphere. This is the period in which schools are closed and the greater part of the holidays are concentrated. Even the pastoral activities in parishes are reduced and I myself have suspended the Audiences for a while. It is therefore a favourable time to give priority to what is effectively most important in life, that is to say, listening to the word of the Lord. We are also reminded of this by this Sunday's Gospel passage with the well known episode of Jesus' visit to the house of Martha and Mary, recounted by St Luke (10: 38-42).

Martha and Mary are two sisters; they also have a brother, Lazarus, but he does not appear on this occasion. Jesus is passing through their village and, the text says, Martha received him at her home (cf. 10: 38). This detail enables us to understand that Martha is the elder of the two, the one in charge of the house. Indeed, when Jesus has been made comfortable, Mary sits at his feet and listens to him while Martha is totally absorbed by her many tasks, certainly due to the special Guest. 

We seem to see the scene: one sister bustling about busily and the other, as it were, enraptured by the presence of the Teacher and by his words. A little later Martha, who is evidently resentful, can no longer resist and complains, even feeling that she has a right to criticize Jesus: "Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her then to help me". Martha would even like to teach the Teacher! Jesus on the other hand answers her very calmly: "Martha, Martha", and the repetition of her name expresses his affection, "you are anxious and troubled about many things; only one thing is needful. Mary has chosen the good portion, which shall not be taken away from her" (10: 41-42). Christ's words are quite clear: there is no contempt for active life, nor even less for generous hospitality; rather, a distinct reminder of the fact that the only really necessary thing is something else: listening to the word of the Lord; and the Lord is there at that moment, present in the Person of Jesus! All the rest will pass away and will be taken from us but the word of God is eternal and gives meaning to our daily actions.

Dear friends, as I said, this Gospel passage is more than ever in tune with the vacation period, because it recalls the fact that the human person must indeed work and be involved in domestic and professional occupations, but first and foremost needs God, who is the inner light of Love and Truth. Without love, even the most important activities lose their value and give no joy. Without a profound meaning, all our activities are reduced to sterile and unorganised activism. And who, if not Jesus Christ, gives us Love and Truth? Therefore, brothers and sisters, let us learn to help each other, to collaborate, but first of all to choose together the better part which is and always will be our greatest good.

Sunday Angelus ⎼ July 18, 2010 ⎼ Pope Benedict XVI

Friday, August 9, 2019

Daily Thought For August 9, 2019

From The Surrender Novena

Close your eyes and let yourself be carried away
on the flowing current of my grace; 
close your eyes and do not think of the present, 
turning your thoughts away from the future 
just as you would from temptation. 
Repose in me, believing in my goodness, 
and I promise you by my love that if you say 
"You take care of it,” I will take care of it all; 
I will console you, 

liberate you and guide you.

from Day 8 of the Surrender Novena (Father Don Dolindo Ruotolo ✝ 1882-1970)

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Daily Thought For August 6, 2019

Faith Helps Us Through Difficult Times

When faith diminishes, difficulties seem greater: Living faith depends on my ability to respond to God, who calls me and wants to treat me as a friend, as One who is the great witness of my life. So if I respond to him and love him, and if he is someone familiar in my life, if I live close to him, I am safeguarding my faith, because my faith is founded on God. . . On the other hand, if I keep my distance from God, if I forget him, if I keep him outside my life and am submerged in merely human and material things, if I let myself be carried away by what is immediately in front of me and God fades from my soul, then how will I have a living faith? If I don't speak with Christ, what is there left of my faith? That is why, in the final analysis, all obstacles to a life of faith may be reduced ⎼ in their root  to a withdrawal, a separation from God: we cease to deal with him face to face. Then it is that temptations and obstacles gain strength. Peter would have remained firm on the waters and would have reached the Lord if he had not separated his confident gaze from the Lord. All the tempests put together, those within the soul and those arising from outside, cannot shake us as long as we have firm recourse to prayer. To abandon prayer, to pray with little intimacy or sincerity, exposes us to sink into discouragement, pessimism and temptation. 

Our faith should never falter even when the difficulties are enormous, even though they seem to crush us under their weight. What does it matter if the whole world with all its power is against you? You. .. go forward! 


Repeat the words of the psalm: 'The Lord is my light and my salvation. Whom shall I fear? . . . Si consistant adversum me castra, non time bit cor meum' Though my enemies surround me, my heart shall not waver.

from In Conversation with God Daily Meditations Volume 4 pp. 305-306

Monday, August 5, 2019

Daily Thought For August 5, 2019

Prayer Is An Act Of Love

Prayer is an act of love; words are not needed. Even if sickness distracts from thoughts, all that is needed is the will to love.


St. Teresa of Avila

Sunday, August 4, 2019

Daily Thought For August 4, 2019

Allowing The Holy Spirit To Guide Us


Trust in the guidance of the One whom I have sent to befriend you, the Holy Spirit, your Advocate. Learn to listen to His gentle leading. The more you follow Him, the more will you understand where and how He is leading you. This is the secret of holiness: to be led by the Holy Spirit in all things. Seek the guidance of the Holy Spirit actively. Call upon Him, for He is, at every moment, available to you. He dwells with Me and with My Father in the sanctuary of your soul. He is your Advocate against the world, the flesh, and the Evil One, the accuser. He is your Advocate with My Father. 

It is the Holy Spirit who unites your soul to Mine, your heart to My Heart in such wise that when you pray, it is My own prayer that ascends to the Father as a fragrant incense. The Holy Spirit comes to the aid of your infirmity, for, it is true, you do not know how to pray as you ought. The unseen work of the Holy Spirit is to bring souls into accord with My priestly intercession before the Father in the sanctuary of heaven and in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar. 

When you come to adoration, put aside every anxiety and care of yours, and allow the Holy Spirit gently to unite you to the prayer that rises from My Eucharistic Heart to the Father. Every need of yours is contained in the prayer I offer to My Father. Be at peace. You may want to pray for this thing or for that, and such prayer is good and is pleasing to My Father, but there is another way, a higher way, and that is to yield to the prayer of My Sacred Heart present in the Most Holy Eucharist and in the glory of heaven. I send the Holy Spirit upon you and upon all My priests that they may enter into this priestly intercession of Mine, without forsaking that other form of intercession, which is, as I said, is also pleasing to My Father when it is childlike and full of confidence in 
His loving providence. 

Intercession is not incompatible with adoration. The soul who adores Me present in the Sacrament of My love will be united to Me in My everlasting intercession before the Face of My Father. My intercession is everlasting even in the glory of eternity because I chose to keep the wounds in My hands and in My feet and in My side. They constitute an uninterrupted pleading for the sake of all: for those in glory that they may go from light to light and from sweetness to sweetness; for those on earth that they may find in My wounds healing, purity, and holiness; and for the souls in purgatory that by the merits of My holy wounds they may be refreshed and delivered. 

I want to impress the marks of My wounds deep in the soul of every priest. My wounds reproduced in the souls of My priests authenticate their intercession at the altar. This is the spiritual stigmata that is the perfection of priestly holiness. The indelible character of My priesthood in your soul renders you capable of this perfect identification with Me in My crucified priesthood and victimhood, and in My glorious priesthood in heaven where I remain for all eternity an offering to My Father. 

You have not yet begun to grasp the potential of priestly holiness, This is what I have wanted to teach you for so long, but the time is now. Accept what I will show you and allow Me to configure you entirely to Myself. Only in this way will you become capable of the work for which I have destined you. 


Now, be silent. Adore Me. Trust Me. I have only begun to show you the path of holiness that I am opening before you. And give thanks to Me, for I have saved you, through a particular intervention of My most holy Mother, from the fate that the Evil One was preparing for you for so long a time. 

from In Sinu Jesu ⎼ When Heart Speaks To Heart The Journal Of A Priest At Prayer pp.51-53

Saturday, August 3, 2019

Daily Thought For August 3, 2019


St. Francis of Assisi & Taming Wolves

However beautiful and various the created world may be, it is also, as Tennyson wrote famously, “red in tooth and claw.” Which brings us to the matter of wolves. According to several sources, Francis helped the peasants of Greccio protect themselves from the ravening wolves who attacked both man and beast in winter by taming the wolves. The most famous story of wolves in relation to Saint Francis is the charming tale recounted in the Little Flowers of Saint Francis about the wolf of Gubbio. Gubbio is a small Umbrian town northeast of Assisi where Francis stayed early in his wanderings. According to the story, a ferocious wolf attacked both people and beasts in the Umbrian town of Gubbio. Francis went outside the town, spoke to the wolf who agreed to stop his attacks (Francis shook his paw as a sign of assent) for which, in turn, the people of the town would provide food for the wolf. Brother Wolf observed his part of the bargain for two years; when he died, the townspeople buried him, and according to the guidebooks his burial place is marked to this day at a church aptly named “della pace” (“of peace”).

That story may have a historical core with the wolf being, in fact, a pitiless ruler who terrorized the citizenry by his rapacious demands and depredations. A medieval commentator on the story said that the wolf was a symbol of the Italian people! Saint Francis, who made a vocation out of pacification, may have reformed a bellicose warlord. Whatever the origin of the story, there is a fundamental and theological motif within it. After all, the prophet Isaiah proclaimed that the coming messiah would inaugurate a time when the wolf would lie down with the lamb in a peaceful kingdom. The story might well illustrate the common perception that Francis was another Christ—an alter christus. In other words, behind the charming folktale recorded in the Fioretti may well be a complex theological observation about Francis as an imitator of Christ and Francis as a preacher of peace and reconciliation.
There is more. According to the biblical tradition, in the period before the Fall, the animals were in harmony with human beings—Adam, according to Genesis, naming the animals. It was only through sin, according to tradition, that this harmony was interrupted. To return to an Edenic simplicity through the cultivation of virtue and the erasure of vice was the mark of those saints who had achieved purity of heart. The ability of Francis to live in peace with the animal world, then, was a sign of his purity and holiness. The stories about his rescue of lambs, the tame pheasant given to him by a nobleman of Siena, the cricket that would perch on his shoulder, the birds who would listen attentively to him as he preached, and the other stories that make the early legends so charming have behind them a theological perception about the state of the soul of Francis.

Cunningham, L. S. (2004). Francis of Assisi: Performing the Gospel Life (pp. 95–97). Grand Rapids, MI; Cambridge, UK: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.

Friday, August 2, 2019

Daily Thought For August 2, 2019

Even-Keeled

We do not very often come across opportunities for exercising strength, magnanimity, or magnificence; but gentleness, temperance, modesty, and humility, are graces which ought to color everything we do. There may be virtues of a more exalted mold, but... these are the most continually called for in daily life.

St. Francis de Sales

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Daily Thought For August 1, 2019

Confidence In Prayer

Acquire the habit of speaking to God as if you were alone with Him, familiarly and with confidence and love, as to the dearest and most loving of friends. Speak to Him often of your business, your plans, your troubles, your fears - of everything that concerns you. Converse with Him confidently and frankly; for God is not wont to speak to a soul that does not speak to Him.

St. Alphonsus Liguori