Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Daily Thought For March 8, 2016

Do You Want To Be Well?


Lectio

John 5:1–16

Meditatio

“Do you want to be well?”

Jesus asked the man waiting at the pool an important question: “Do you want to be well?” Although he did want to be well, the man admitted to Jesus that he needed help. Jesus then healed the man, commanding him to “rise, take up your mat, and walk.”

As we ponder this man’s experience, we reflect on our own inability to heal ourselves of our spiritual infirmities and sinfulness. We too are weak and incapable of overcoming them on our own. We need Jesus’ help.

Lent is an opportunity for us to ponder more deeply the incredible truth that the Second Person of the Trinity became a human being specifically for this purpose. Jesus died and rose to save us from our sins and to sanctify us. This awareness leads us to turn to him in our need. When Jesus asks us, “Do you want to be well?” we cry out, “Yes, Lord, heal me!”

Through our experience we know that we will not be changed in a dramatic moment, but over the daily living of our life. God’s grace and action free us from our sinfulness gradually. Little by little our thoughts, attitudes, desires, words, and actions become holier. As our love and commitment to God deepen, our need to try to do everything on our own lessens. This frees us so that we can more trustingly abandon ourselves to the care and action of God. Then he is able to more greatly effect our healing and transformation. 

Sometimes we will fall. But these become occasions for us to ask pardon, to renew our resolve, and to hear Jesus’ words again: “Do you want to be well?” We repeat our response, “Yes, Lord, heal me,” knowing that his healing words for us will be fulfilled.

Oratio

When I contemplate your healing of the man at the pool, Jesus, I pause to consider you as my healer. Sometimes I get so caught up in the busyness of my day that I lose sight of my desire to become a more spiritual person. Sometimes I even wonder if I will ever overcome my weaknesses. I recognize that by myself I cannot. You, Jesus, are my hope, my healer. You see my spiritual infirmities and sinfulness. With great confidence I turn to you and open myself to your loving and healing action. “Yes, Jesus, I want to be well. Please heal me.”

Contemplatio

Jesus is my healer.


Daughters of Saint Paul. (2008). Lenten Grace: Daily Gospel Reflections (pp. 76–77). Boston, MA: Pauline Books & Media.